AC Comfort Blog

It’s Almost Fall—But Your Air Conditioner Is Still Hard at Work

September 7th, 2020

sunshineYou probably know what Texas weather is like—summer temperatures hang around for a long time, even after the official first day of fall. We started the month of September with temperatures in the high 90s. That’s serious air conditioner weather. An air conditioner can lower the temperature inside a house by a maximum of 20°F. So when you have a 96°F day, you almost have to work the AC to the maximum to get the house down to the recommended 78°F for comfort. (Try not to set the thermostat lower than this, especially in intense heat, since it not only wastes energy, it can actually lead to the evaporator coil icing over.)

All this preamble is our way of saying that it’s crucial to watch for signs you need AC repair in Cypress, TX at this time of year. The heat is intense and the air conditioner is working as hard as it ever has after months of consistent operation. This can put an air conditioner into the danger zone, even one that has always gotten spring maintenance. (Just a reminder: the AC needs maintenance every year.)

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Ductless AC Can Work With a Central AC—It’s Not All-or-Nothing!

August 24th, 2020

ductless-system-with-technicianWe offer services for a wide range of types of air conditioning in Houston, TX. For example, we install and service ductless mini split systems, which offer houses both cooling and heating without the need for an inch of ductwork.

One of the best reasons to have a ductless AC installed is because you live in an older house that wasn’t originally constructed for central cooling and has no ductwork to hook a split system air conditioner to. If you’re planning to build a house and don’t want to deal with pesky ducts, you can design with a ductless system in mind.

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Too Much Refrigerant in the AC? Yes, It Can Happen—And It’s Bad!

August 10th, 2020

ac-unit-repair-with-technicianA common and major repair problem air conditioning systems run into is leaking refrigerant. Tiny holes along the copper refrigerant lines allow the refrigerant level in the system to drop, and that puts the entire air conditioner in jeopardy. Air conditioning systems are manufactured to run a specific charge (amount) of refrigerant. If that drops, it will not only lower cooling capacity, it will eventually inflict irreparable damage to the components, concluding with a burnt-out compressor.

There’s an opposite to the problem of the undercharged air conditioner with refrigerant leaks. It’s the overcharged air conditioner. The refrigerant level cannot be more than the unit’s specified charge, because that puts the system in danger as well.

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Thinking About an Evaporative Cooler? Here’s What You Need to Know

July 27th, 2020

waterYou may have heard about evaporative coolers as an alternative to using a conventional central air conditioning system. Evaporative coolers are popular now as small, portable units people purchase to sit on a desk and give a bit of extra cooling. But evaporative cooling is available as a way of air conditioning an entire house through a ductwork system. Using an evaporative cooler (also called a swamp cooler) offers a number of potential benefits to a home.

However, before you decide you’re going to replace your old AC with a swamp cooler, there are some basics you’ll need to know. Evaporative coolers are not ideal for all homes!

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Is a High SEER Rating for a New AC Always Good?

July 13th, 2020

ac-with-toolsIn the world of air conditioners, SEER ratings are just about everything. We’re sure that when you started looking into an air conditioner, you did a little research and quickly stumbled upon SEER ratings. SEER stands for Season Energy Efficiency Ratio. It’s what you use to measure how efficient an air conditioner is. Most of the time, you’d think that the higher the SEER rating the better, right? But what if this isn’t always true?

We’re going to get into everything that you need to understand below. For now though, just know that you can contact us for everything air conditioning in Katy, TX. We’re the professionals that know their stuff. You won’t be disappointed with our work.

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Why Doesn’t the AC Respond to the Thermostat?

June 29th, 2020

setting-thermostatThis is frustrating. The heat is rising outside, and you need your house cooled down. You go to the thermostat, make whatever adjustments are needed to get the air conditioner running—and then nothing happens. Or whatever happens doesn’t result in the comfortable house you expected.

The unresponsive thermostat often requires calling for AC repair in Houston, TX. Even the most basic manual slider thermostats cannot be repaired with DIY techniques or amateur tinkering. It’s not only that thermostats are too complicated to fix; it’s that the problem may not actually be the thermostat but located elsewhere in the HVAC system. A huge part of professional air conditioning repair is diagnosing what’s wrong—and you can’t get that from amateurs or a “do-it-yourself” YouTube video.

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Can My AC Deal With the Summer Humidity?

June 15th, 2020

desk-fanNobody likes it when the humidity rises on a hot summer day, because we know what that feels like—a much hotter day. The truth is that high humidity doesn’t raise the temperature of the air. What it does is make it harder for our bodies to release heat through our skin. More heat is trapped in our bodies, and so we feel even hotter. Think of humidity as like throwing a blanket around your body on a hot day. Not something you would want to do.

“Yeah, humidity is rough in summer,” you say, “but I’ve got my air conditioner to handle it.”

Except that’s not quite how it works…

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No Air From the Vents? AC Air Not Cool? You May Have a Broken AC Fan!

June 1st, 2020

Spinning-fan-closeupAir conditioners are complex pieces of machinery, so when anything in them breaks, it requires detective work to locate the cause. This is one of the reasons we recommend you turn to professionals only when you have an air conditioning system that isn’t working. Unless the problem is basic–like a tripped circuit breaker–it takes skilled technicians to find out what the specific malfunction is so it can be fixed.

Today we’re looking at a common source of a “no cool” air conditioner: a broken fan. There are two fans in an air conditioning system handling different jobs. If either fails, you won’t have indoor cooling.

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Why Is There Water Leaking From My Air Conditioner?

May 18th, 2020

question-mark-badgeYou don’t want anything in your house to leak, especially not parts of the plumbing or the water heater. But have you thought about the air conditioning system leaking? It may not have crossed your mind it could happen, until you see evidence that it’s happening: water dripping out of the HVAC cabinet and starting to puddle on the floor.

“What is going on?”

We can hazard a good guess, since this is a common problem we’ve seen in many air conditioners. And it’s also one we’ve fixed many times. We’ll go into what is probably going on below, but chances are high you’ll need to call us for air conditioning repair in Katy, TX to correct the trouble. You may lose your cooled home without proper repairs.

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AC Troubleshooting Help—And When to Call for Help

May 4th, 2020

ac-with-toolsWe know you’re probably concerned about the performance of your air conditioning system over the next few months when our temperatures start to spike. Nobody wants to be caught with a busted AC on a roasting Texas summer day, and scrambling to get air conditioning repair in Katy, TX during a stressful time isn’t anything you want to go through.

Unfortunately, this concern may tempt you to try doing AC repairs on your own. Please don’t! A toolkit and a few online tutorials will not allow you to effectively and safely fix an air conditioning system. It’ll likely end up making the situation worse. When you’ve got an AC that needs to be fixed, have it done right with a call to our team.

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